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Monthly Archives: February 2017

  • Beekeeping Classes with the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association (LACBA)

    updated 1-3-19

    Beekeeping at The Valley Hive

    The Valley Hive is looking forward to hosting the 2019 Beekeeping 101 Classes for the Los Angeles County Beekeepers Association (LACBA). The first class of the season will be on Sunday, February 10th from 9-12pm. All classes will be held on the second Sunday of the month. 

    CLASS SCHEDULE

    Class #1: Sunday., 2/10/19, 9am-noon. Topic: Preparing to Be a Beekeeper; Is Beekeeping Right for You, Things to Consider, Benefits, What Do I Need? (NO BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive's store: 10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd., Chatsworth, CA 91311.

    Class #2: Sunday, 3/10/19, 9am-noon. Topic: Putting together a hive box; placement of your hive; installing a package. (NO BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive's store: 10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd., Chatsworth, CA 91311. (DAYLIGHT SAVINGS DAY!)

    Class #3:  Sunday, 4/14/19, 9am-noon. Topics: How to install a bee package. Inspecting your hive. (BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive’s apiary: 9633 Baden Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311.

    Class #4:  Sunday, 5/12/19, 9am-noon. Topic: Inspecting your hive. (BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive’s apiary: 9633 Baden Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311.

    Class #5:  Sunday, 6/09/19,  9am-noon. Topic: Treating for pests. (BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive’s apiary: 9633 Baden Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311.

    Class #6:  Sunday, 7/14/19, 9am-noon. Topic: Treating for pests. (BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive’s apiary: 9633 Baden Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311.

    Class #7:  Sunday, 8/11/19, 9am-noon. Topic: Splitting a hive, honey extraction. (BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive’s apiary: 9633 Baden Ave., Chatsworth, CA 91311.

    September:  No Bee Class. We will be volunteering on various dates at the Los Angeles County Fair Bee Booth, sharing our beekeeping knowledge and experience to educate others.

    Class #8: Sunday, 10/13/19, 9am-noon. Topic: Last class of the 2018 season. (BEE SUIT REQUIRED.) Location: The Valley Hive - TBD.

    In Beekeeping Class 101 you learn the basics of beekeeping. This is a great class for beginning beekeepers and an excellent refresher course.

    Our goal: To walk you through an entire season of keeping bees.

    You’ll learn:

    • Care of ourselves and others as we learn responsible beekeeping in an urban environment
    • Protective clothing (bee suit, hat, veil, gloves, etc.)
    • Construction of a hive
    • Safe placement of a hive
    • How to approach a hive
    • Stages of life cycle within a colony
    • General maintenance of a hive
    • Troubleshooting in the hive
    • Diseases, mites, moths, and their treatment
    • What to do if you come in contact with an aggressive hive
    • Bee stings

    Beekeeping References

    Starting Your First Backyard Hive

    Beekeeping Videos:

     

    Stop In For A Visit

    We invite you to stop by anytime during regular business hours, so that we can answer any of your questions or help you with your beekeeping needs.  We are buzzed to be a part of your beekeeping journey!

    The Valley Hive business hours:
    Open daily from 8:30-5pm
    10538 Topanga Canyon Blvd, Chatsworth
    (818) 280-6500

     

  • Finding Bees for Your Hive

    WHERE DO I GET MY BEES?

    After you set up your beehive, the next step is to fill it with bees!  Here we will discuss the different types of Honey Bees, and the various methods used to obtain bees.

    DO ALL BEES PRODUCE HONEY?   felicia bees on a frame

    There are more than 20,000 species of bees in the world. While the U.S. is home to approximately 4,000 types of native bees, Honey Bees (Apis Mellifera) are not native to the United States.  The European Honey Bee (Apis Mellifera Linnaeus) was brought to America in the 17th century by the early European settlers. Consequently, the Honey Bees that we use mostly descend from European races of Honey Bees. Honey Bees are the only insects that make food for human consumption. And like a lot of animals and insects that are found all over the world, Honey Bees also differ from one another based on a lot of factors.

    BEE STOCK

    There are many different types of Honey Bee species in the world. Since the 1800’s, beekeepers have been breeding bees with certain characteristics for a particular purpose, whether it be for pollination, honey, or bee production.

    “The term “stock” is defined as a loose combination of traits that characterize a particular group of bees. Such groups can be divided by species, race, region, population, or breeding line in a commercial operation. Many of the current “stocks” in the United States can be grouped at one or more of these levels…” – David Tarpy, 2005. The Different Types of Honey Bees. AG-645, NC State University, Cooperative Extension Servicer

    Bee stock can vary greatly. Any generalities about a particular stock should be treated with caution, since there are always exceptions to the rule. The most common types of Honey Bees available in the U.S. are: The Italian Bee, The Carniolan Bee, The German Bee, The Caucasian Bee, The Buckfast Bee, and The Russian Bee. To learn more about these bees and their attributes, check out the following link:

    http://beesource.com/resources/usda/the-different-types-of-honey-bees/

    WHERE DO I GET THE BEES FOR MY HIVE?

    If you want gentle bees, purchasing your bees through a reputable bee breeder is your best chance.  Although, there are other options for obtaining bees.

    swarm on iron gate 01

    SWARMS

    One way to start a hive is by collecting a swarm.  A swarm is merely a group of bees with a queen that has left their home in search of a new one. Since they don’t have any brood (developing baby bees) or honey to guard, they are generally very gentle.  Before the swarm finds a permanent home, the cluster of bees might take up temporary residence in a bush or low lying branch. Swarms are relatively easy to catch, but some beekeeping knowledge is helpful.

    As a new beekeeper in Southern California, starting out with a package of bees or a nucleus of bees may be a safer way to start a hive. While swarms are gentle, many of the bee colonies in Southern California contain some degree of Africanized genetics. Africanized Bees are more aggressive than their counterpart, the European Honey Bee, and keeping Africanized Honey Bees is not advisable. Oftentimes, when dealing with these bees, they become more aggressive as the colony grows.  So, while the temperament of the swarm may appear gentle, the behavior can change with time.

    CUT-OUTS

    Another way to start a hive, is by doing a cut out. This procedure involves removing and relocating a colony of bees from one location to another. Relocating a hive is an advanced beekeeping technique. Depending on the size of the hive, doing a cut-out can be complex, messy, and time consuming.  Proceed with caution and be sure to assess the temperament of the bees. We recommend that you hire a professional, if this is the route you choose to take.

    IMG_0016 reduced


    PACKAGED BEES

    A package of bees is approximately two or three pounds of bees. The bees arrive in a wooden or plastic box, with a mated queen hanging inside in her own cage. Installing a package is easy.  Watch our YouTube video to see how a package is installed. The Valley Hive sells Italian Bees, which are known for their favorable temperament. They are also excellent honey producers.

    5 frames of bees

    NUC OF BEES

    A Nuc, short for nucleus, is a small colony of bees. Consisting of 5 frames of bees, the queen has already been introduced to the bees and a combination of eggs, larvae, and honey are present. A Nuc contains bees and frames, but the remainder of equipment including the hive body, top cover, bottom board and 5 additional frames, is sold separately. A feeder is also recommended so that the colony can easily build out the first box with the necessary comb needed to store honey and eggs.  The Valley Hive sells nucs as well as the additional equipment you will need.

    NEED HELP?

    The Valley Hive is here to answer all your bee related questions. We invite you to stop by during our regular business hours which can be found on our website. Taking classes through The Los Angeles County Beekeeping Association (LACBA) is a great way to get started. For more information about the classes, check the LACBA website.

     

     

     

  • Bees 2017

     

    BEES 2017

    Reserve your package now on our website!

    The best time to start your beehive is in the Spring. Packaged bees are plentiful at this time, and the bees populations begin to explode. Reserve your bees now to guarantee your order. Packages will be available for PICK UP ONLY in the middle of April. The exact date will be announced soon. Nucs (5 frames of bees) are created from packages Bees, so they are available later in the season.  We recommend that you place your order early, as bees do sell out.   If you have additional questions, please send us an email at info@thevalleyhive.com or give us a buzz at (818) 280-6500. 

     

    PACKAGED BEES:

    IMG_0010

    A package of bees is approximately three pounds of bees. The bees arrive in a wooden  box, with a mated queen hanging inside in her own cage. Installing a package is easy.  Watch our YouTube video to see how a package is installed. The Valley Hive sells Italian Bees, which are known for their favorable temperament. They are also excellent honey producers.

     

    NUCS:

    5 frames of bees

    A Nuc, short for nucleus, is a small colony of bees. Consisting of 5 frames of bees, the queen has already been introduced to the bees and a combination of eggs, larvae, and honey are present. A Nuc contains bees and frames, but the remainder of equipment including the hive body, top cover, bottom board and 5 additional frames, is sold separately. A feeder is also recommended so that the colony can easily build up their first box with the necessary comb needed to store honey and eggs.

    QUEENS:

    IMG_0053

    Mated, Italian, California Queens will be available in the Spring.  The queen arrives in a queen cage (above)  with attendants. Queens will be available later in the season. Check our website for updates.

3 Item(s)

Working Hours
We are open 7 days a week from 8:30am-5:00pm
We have moved! Our new address is 10538 Topanga Cyn Blvd. Chatsworth, CA 91311
(818) 280-6500
 
 
 
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